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IDS 101: Can It Happen Here?: The History of Fascism in the US: Chicago Style Guide

Style Guide

Library Guide to Citation Styles

Zotero

Zotero is a free, open source browser app that collects, manages, cites, and shares your research sources. It lives right in your web browser, and has a similar design to the iTunes library. 

For help with Zotero contact:
Bill Kelm, bkelm@willamette.edu or
John Repplinger, jrepplin@willamette.edu

For more information on Zotero, see our Zotero Library Guide.  

Chicago Style Guide

The Chicago style tends to be used with the humanities (e.g. literature, history, arts). The library has an online subscription, and the print edition is located in the citation manual collection by the reference desk.

The Chicago Manual of Style presents two basic documentation systems, the humanities style (notes and bibliography) and the author-date system. Choosing between the two often depends on subject matter and nature of sources cited, as each system is favored by different groups of scholars.

The humanities style is preferred by many in literature, history, and the arts. This style presents bibliographic information in notes and, often, a bibliography. It accommodates a variety of sources, including esoteric ones less appropriate to the author-date system.

The more concise author-date system has long been used by those in the physical, natural, and social sciences. In this system, sources are briefly cited in the text, usually in parentheses, by author’s last name and date of publication. The short citations are amplified in a list of references, where full bibliographic information is provided.