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IDS 101: Hamlet: Using the Library

What Librarians Can Do for You

You can set up an individual research consultation with a subject librarian for research help. Here are a few other things that we can do for you:

  • Show you the best places to begin your research.
     
  • Locate the information you need within our library or elsewhere.
     
  • Help you cite information correctly (e.g. APA style).
     
  • Judge the quality & reliability of information.
     
  • Teach you how to use information ethically (e.g. avoiding plagiarism).
     
  • Determine whether something is peer-reviewed.

Hours during the Academic Year

Library Hours


Mon-Thur    8 a.m. -- Midnight
Friday         8 a.m. -- 9 p.m.
Saturday    10 a.m. -- 6 p.m.
Sunday      10 a.m. -- Midnight

Reference Hours


Mon-Thur   10 a.m. -- 5 p.m.
                    6 p.m. -- 9 p.m.
Friday         1 p.m. -- 4 p.m
Saturday         (Closed)
Sunday           (Closed)

Archives Hours


Contact:  archives@willamette.edu for an appointment.

Note: The library is closed to the general public and open to students, faculty, and staff with current Willamette ID.

More calendar info...

Online Encyclopedias

Authoritative Reference Sources vs Wikipedia

Wikipedia is a great resource for getting general info about something, but because anyone can contribute or change its content it is considered unreliable.  College faculty typically do not consider Wikipedia a credible information source. 

Instead, use the library's print or electronic encyclopedias, dictionaries, or other reference books to backup the basic information of your research paper. These resources have gone through an editorial process to check for accuracy. To the right and below are some resources that may be of use.

Library Home Page ( library.willamette.edu )

Using the Hatfield Library during the Covid 19 Pandemic

Reference / Getting Research Help:

  • Reference interactions will be virtual this semester. We will use chat and Zoom for most of these interactions.
     
  • If you don’t have a device with Zoom with you, we have workstations set up in the library that you can use.

Circulation / Checking Out Books, DVDs, etc.:

  • All items removed from the shelves, returned, or ordered via ILL or Summit will be quarantined for 96 hours before being available.
     
  • Contactless check out will remain available for those that request it in the front vestibule. You may access the vestibule with your valid ID 24 hours/day.

Building Policies for Fall Semester 2020:

  • The maximum occupancy of the Hatfield Library is 100 people.
  • Access is restricted to current students, faculty, and staff.
  • Bring your ID card.  A card swipe is required for access.
  • Water fountains have been shut down until further notice.
  • Closed container beverages are permitted.
  • Eating is not allowed.
  • Masks are required.
  • Seating is marked to encourage 6 feet of social distancing.


Want more information about the new changes?

Print Reference Books

Below are key reference books that provide a general overview of a topic or help identify synonyms, related terms, or basic data. These sources often include references and lists of further readings.

Mark O. Hatfield Library Building

Humanities and Fine Arts Librarian

Online Reference Books

John Barrymore as Hamlet (1922)

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Course Description

This course will focus on The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, Shakespeare’s longest, most frequently performed, and probably most famous play. Written around the year 1600, it features murder, poison, dueling, a ghost, a drowning, a graveyard scene, an imminent military invasion, all sorts of treachery, and a cast of well-known secondary characters. In addition to reading the text closely over the course of the semester and comparing it to at least three different film versions, we will also investigate at least three different printed versions from Shakespeare’s time. Finally, to close the semester, we will read Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, a well-known spin-off play that, in the manner of television shows like Better Call Saul or Legacies, follows secondary characters into their own dramas