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IDS 101: Imagining Indigenous Futures: Reference Materials

Imagining Indigenous Futures Course Description

What might it mean to imagine Indigenous futures?  In this learning community, we’ll travel on a journey across space timelines and explore leading edge speculative fiction and art by Indigenous artists, creative use of gaming and video technologies for Indigenous storytelling and community building, and Indigenous design as a strategy to address climate change.  Across the world, Indigenous peoples are leading movements for environmental protection, climate change, and adaptive design.  In this highly experiential and place-based course, we will read science   fiction by Native writers, engage with multi-media and film, and visit local tribal communities who are imaginatively envisioning a more just future for all people and beings through housing, environmental, and health initiatives.

Course taught by: Rebecca J. Dobkins
Colloquium Associate: Sydney Louchard

Authoritative Reference Sources vs Wikipedia

Wikipedia is a great resource for getting general info about something, but because anyone can contribute or change its content it is considered unreliable.  College faculty typically do not consider Wikipedia a credible information source. 

Instead, use the library's print or electronic encyclopedias, dictionaries, or other reference books to backup the basic information of your research paper. These resources have gone through an editorial process to check for accuracy. To the right and below are some resources that may be of use.

Hours during the Academic Year

Library Hours


Mon-Thur    9 a.m. -- 9 p.m.
Friday         9 a.m. -- 5 p.m.
Saturday    Closed
Sunday      1 p.m. -- 9 p.m.

Reference Hours


Mon-Wed   10 a.m. -- 5 p.m.
                    6 p.m. -- 9 p.m.

Thursday   10 a.m. -- 5 p.m.
Friday         1 p.m. -- 4 p.m
Saturday         (Closed)
Sunday           (Closed)

Archives Hours


Contact:  archives@willamette.edu for an appointment.

Note: The library is closed to the general public and open to students, faculty, and staff with current Willamette ID.

More calendar info...

Reference Books (Print)

Below are key reference books that provide a general overview of a topic or help identify synonyms, related terms, or basic data. These sources often include references and lists of further readings.

Reference E-books

Subject Librarian

Joni Roberts's picture
Joni Roberts
Contact:
Mark O. Hatfield Library
900 State Street
Salem, OR 97301
503-370-6741

What librarians can do for you...

Subject librarians are here to help with your research!

You can set up an individual research consultation with a subject librarian for research help. Here are a few other things that we can do for you:

- Show you the best places to begin your research.

- Help you develop effective search strategies.

- Locate the information you need within our library.

- Obtain books, articles, cds, etc. from other libraries.

- Find additional information from citation lists/bibliographies.

- Judge the quality & reliability of information.

- Use information ethically (e.g. plagiarism).

- Cite information correctly (e.g. APA style).

- Demonstrate how to use citation resources.

- Tell the difference between various literature types.

- Determine whether something is peer-reviewed.