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ENGL 341: Shakespeare: MLA Style Guide, Zotero & H-Drive

Other Resources

For more citation styles, click here.

 

All of the books listed here can be found in the Citation Collection, located adjacent to the reference desk.

MLA Style Guide

The Modern Language Association (MLA) style is designed for the humanities (e.g. English, Spanish, German). These examples are adapted from the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers and provides examples of how to document source material when preparing scholarly papers.  Printed copies of the MLA Handbook are located in the citation manual collection by the reference desk (Call number: Reference LB2369.G53 2003).

You will need to cite your sources in two places within your paper: in-text and bibliography
Part I outlines how to cite a source in the paragraph where you have quoted, summarized, or paraphrased from the source (called an in-text citation)

Part II outlines how to create an list of references, known as a bibliography, at the end of your paper that lists anything you cite.

MLA Part I

PART I- CITATIONS IN TEXT

You must cite the source of either a quotation or paraphrased material. Include the author's name and the page number(s) from which the material was taken in parentheses following the statement you make. If you mention the author in the text, you do not have to repeat his or her name in the citation. If you cite more than one work by the same author in your paper, you must include a short title to inform the reader of which work you are citing.

Citing Books

Citing author in text:
In A Critical History of American Literature David Lynch provides a useful discussion of the Romantics (538-89), as well as authors from other periods.

 

Citing author in reference:
The author has described this era to be "the most turbulent in modern history" (Brown 21).

Citing Periodicals

Citing author in text:
In "The Threshold of the Mountain in Dante's Divine Comedy," Helen Luke notes that "almost daily this great image of Dante's passage from the blind murk to the shining dark may come to our aid"(55).

 

Citing author in reference:
In the 1990s, media coverage of police brutality reached an all time high (Marshall 6).

MLA Part II

PART II - REFERENCES

Book by a single author:
Pollak, Vivian R. Dickinson: The Anxiety of Gender. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1984.

Book by multiple authors:
Holman, C. Hugh and William Harman. A Handbook to Literature. New York: Macmillan, 1992.

Article in a reference book:
"Mandarin." Encyclopedia Americana. 1980 ed.

Article in a journal with continuous pagination:
Spear, Karen. "Building Cognitive Skills in Basic Writers." Teaching English in the Two-Year College 9 (1983): 91-98.

Article in a journal that pages each issue separately or that uses only issue numbers:
Lyon, George Ella. "Contemporary Appalachian Poetry: Sources and Directions." Kentucky Review 2.2 (1981): 3-22.

Article from a weekly or biweekly periodical:
Begley, Sharon. "A Healthy Dose of Laughter." Newsweek 4 Oct. 1982: 60-88.

 

Article from a monthly or bimonthly periodical:
Snyder, Mark. "Self-Fulfilling Stereotypes." Psychology Today July 1982: 60-88.

 

An article from a daily newspaper:
Collin, Glenn. "Single-Father Survey Finds Adjustment a Problem." New York Times 21 Nov. 1983, late ed.: B17.

Internet Resources

Basic citation components and punctuation for individual works
    Author/editor. Title. Edition statement (if given). Place of publication: publisher, date. Medium. Source of electronic information (if available). Available: URL. Access date.

Examples:

    Unlandherm, Frank. Middle East studies resources . New York: Columbia University, 1997. Online. Columbia University: Available: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/libraries/indiv/area/MiddleEast/index.html. 19 August 1997.


    Arab republic of Egypt
    . Austin, TX: Center for Middle East Studies, 1 June 1997. Online. Middle East Network Information Center. Available: http://menic.utexas.edu/menic/countries/egypt.html. 18 August 1997.


For other examples of citing Internet resources see:

The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (Ref. LB 2369 .G53 2003) sections 5.9 (page 207), sections 6.4 (page 242) and the index for further specific electronic citation questions.

Miscellaneous

The MLA has a helpful link for questions on their website called Frequently Asked Questions about MLA style.

Zotero

 

Zotero is a free, open source browser app that collects, manages, cites, and shares your research sources. It lives right in your web browser, and has a similar design to the iTunes library. 

For help with Zotero contact:
Bill Kelm, bkelm@willamette.edu or
John Repplinger, jrepplin@willamette.edu

Network Storage

Students, faculty and staff have access to personal storage space on Willamette's network file server.  The NetFiles storage space can be used to store and back up data for classes, projects and academic research.  The file servers themselves are backed up regularly and data can be recovered in cases of local hard drive failures or accidental file corruption or deletion.  All members of the community are strongly encouraged to save any files that cannot afford to be lost to their NetFiles storage space. 

The disk quota for each account is 20 GB.  You can check your current NetFiles disk usage online.

NetFiles makes daily copies of each stored file, called snapshots. These snapshots are user-accessible so you can retrieve your own files from a previous version. Please contact the WITS Help Desk or your user services consultant for help accessing or using the snapshots.

The file server may be accessed from any computer that has network connectivity. It is similar to DropBox or other on-line storage services - and it's completely free.  Here's how to connect to your NetFiles storage:

On-Campus access: Map drives for PCsMap drives for Macs OSX
Off-Campus access: Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP)
Personal Web Pages: Netfile directory
More info at: http://www.willamette.edu/wits/help/home/index.html

Writing Center

  
   

Having problems writing your paper?  The Writing Center offers individual appointments with a writing consultant. Writing Center Consultants will give honest feedback about where the writing confuses them, or loses them, particularly interests them, leaves them needing additional explanation or support, and the like. They can help writers to organize their arguments more effectively by asking them, for example, what the organizing principle at work in the current draft is.

Writing Center Web Page
(503-370-6959)

FORD HALL HOURS (Room 105)

  • Sun 3-9:00 pm
  • Mon 6-9:00 pm
  • Tue 6-9:00 pm
  • Wed 6-9:00 pm
  • Thu 3-9:00 pm

HATFIELD LIBRARY HOURS

  • Mon 6-9:00 pm
  • Tue 6-9:00 pm
  • Wed 6-9:00 pm

Support for students whose home language is not English will also be provided. Appointments are available for signup on the WISE site, Writing Center, with those of all other consultants.  Print forms are available in the Writing Center (Ford 105)