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BIOL 244: Physiological Dynamics of Animals: Main

Dr. Emma Coddington

Image of Professor Emma Coddington

Course Description

This course explores comparative animal physiology; examining how multicellular creatures evolve, navigate their niches, thrive and survive. Attention is on the integration of functional qualities from the molecular to the organ-system levels of organization, the non-linear nature of scaling, and the dynamic nature of living systems. We explore fundamental systems such as the cardiovascular and gastro-intestinal systems, and integrate the functions of endocrine and nervous systems involved in detection, whole animal regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. Learning is active and student-centered, engaging community-centered approaches to grow content as well as skills required in the team-centered current workplaces. Attention to science and society is intended to offer historical context and to clarify power, privilege and difference in current STEM practices. Our work in this class uses a wide range of literature and texts, small-group work, mini-lectures, and an emphasis on 'learning-by-doing' in laboratory research.

Historically this course was built by two physiologists: one a plant physiologist (Dr. Gary Tallman) and the other a comparative animal physiologist (Dr. Scott Hawke).  The course was called PDAP:  Physiological Dynamics of Animals And Plants. Dr. Emma Coddington is the resident comparative physiologist and neuroscientist in the Biology Department, and PDAP has shifted to be centered squarely on comparative animal physiology (CAP) and a shared community knowledge approach.

Read more about Dr. Emma Coddington's research.